There are a range of different professionals who provide in home care. They include:

Registered Nurses (RNs)

Registered nurses treat patients, provide advice, give education and emotional support to both patients and families. They take records of patient history, monitor symptoms, help with diagnostic tests, analyze their results, operate medical devices, deliver treatment and medication and assist with patient follow-ups and rehabilitation.

For in-home care, they teach patients and their families how to manage their illnesses and explain post treatment care. This can include diet and exercise as well as a medication program. In-home nursing can give patients the follow-up care and rehabilitation that they need after being discharged from a hospital.

They can develop their own plans in conjunction with the directions of the physician to do a wide range of things. These can include checking dosages and avoiding interactions of medication, administering medication, using IV lines, administering treatments or therapies, observing patients and recording the information as well as consulting with doctors or other healthcare professionals.

Licensed Vocational or Practical Nurses (LVNs, LPNs)

These are nurses who care for patients under the supervision of registered nurses and doctors. They provide basic bedside care, measure and record vital signs, give injections and enemas, monitor catheters, dress wounds and give alcohol rubs and massages. They also assist with hygiene tasks, feeding, moving patients, standing and walking in order to keep customers comfortable and active. They also provide supervision for nursing assistants and aides.

Personal Care Aids (PCAs)

These aides help people with disabilities, the elderly and those recovering from illness with their daily tasks. This can include housekeeping, laundry, meal preparation as well as hygiene tasks and dressing. They can also help with running errands and transportation.

Home Health Aides (HHAs)

Home Health Aides perform similar care to the Personal Care Aides mentioned above, but they also have undergone state-approved training, which gives them the knowledge to recognize signs and symptoms of further health problems so that they can report them.

Physical Therapists (PTs)

These therapists work with a wide range of patients who have difficulty with movement. Helping both adults and children, they aim to improve the mobility of their patients and are experts in assisting people who are rehabilitating from joint replacement surgery.

Occupational Therapists (OTs)

Occupational therapists work with patients that struggle with their activities of daily living. They can work with people who have cognitive impairments, disabilities or those who are convalescing to improve the patient’s ability to take care of themselves and be more independent.

Speech Language Pathologists (STs)

Speech therapists specialize in helping patients who struggle with speech or swallowing. They commonly work with stroke patients or people who have had face or neck surgery to help them regain their independence.

Medical Social Workers (MSWs)

These social workers help patients and their families cope and adapt with illnesses. They also show them how they can use community resources to assist.